Truyền thuyết về Đảo Quốc Sư Tử SINGAPORE (Eng

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Truyền thuyết về Đảo Quốc Sư Tử SINGAPORE (Eng

Bài gửi  khoa123 on Sat Jun 23, 2007 2:46 pm

He will go down in history as one of Asia's most famous (or infamous)
statesmen. "The Singapore Story" tells one side of the story - Lee's.
Former Singaporean prime minister Lee Kuan Yew has long been acclaimed
for his outspoken persona and alert and thorough intellect. However, it
is not certain that he is fully aware of his impact (or maybe he is) on
other people - specially on Tunku Abdul Rahman. With this, the
inaugural volume of his autobiography, he also proves himself as an
charming and pleasant narrator - and therein lies the problem. The tone
of the book is almost benign - but was her really. His tale begins as
an distinguished student from a non pretentious bourgeois, English
speaking home (this proves problematic in the future as Lee makes his
way around the Chinese speaking communities). Lee's
deftly moves to recount how his education was discontinued by the
Japanese occupation in World War II - of which he also elaborates how
it taught him the many life lessons and impressions he would take into
the future political and personal trials he would undergo. After a
brief experiment as a black-market entrepreneur during the war (for
which he was able to support his family as well as other interests), he
decided to make his way to England after the Japanese defeat - to
become a practitioner of the Law. He recounts as well how he managed to
convinced Cambridge University to admit - not just himself - but his
future wife Choo as well - they were both eventually called to the Bar
in England. Upon passing the British rendition of the bar examination,
Lee decides to return home - to Singapore. Lee is quickly embroiled in
the complex labyrinth of Singaporean politics of independence while
both fighting and using - the Communist Party. If you read between the
lines, it is clear that Lee was anxious to be rid of this red menace
while playing "The Prince" and playing sides against each other.Convinced
that the red threat from Singapore could only be controlled by
assimilation into the federation of Malaysia, the Tunku entertains the
call by Lee to form Malaysia. Lee's story, told in extended and
obviously well documented detail really zeroes in on his dream of
uniting Singapore with Malaysia - only for it to come apart in the
seams - of which he is not completely blameless. Lee bitterly relates
his disappointment over Malaysian Prime Minister Tunku Abdul Rahman's
decision to ungraciously expel Singapore from the recently formed
Malaysian federation. Lee wishes to play the victim. If you treat each
side as a discourse - with its own set of truth creating mechanisms
(ontology) and societal formulas - it will be quickly evident the Lee's
formula is not welcome in the Tunku's Malaysia. No matter which side of
the argument the reader places him/herself, Lee posed a threat to
everything that the Tunku and his cadre held dear. As much as Lee
viewed (or perceived) the ills or threat that the Tunku's cadre (if not
the Tunku himself) represented, Lee had to admit that he was not in his
"zone" - he was out of his element. He did, in effect, break a trust
not to engage in federal politics (as originally agreed) - predictably
causing the ire of the Tunku. It is the chickens coming home to roost.While
gracious towards the Tunku, Lee turns his harshest appraisals of other
politicians in Kuala Lumpur - zeroing in on the close cadre of the
Tunku - the book goes into very informative detail in this regard.
Lee's wonderfully in-depth character analyses and impressions only
foreshadows volume two (Lee, Kuan Yew From Third World to First - The
Singapore Story: 1965 - 2000 Singapore and the Asian Economic Boom New
York: HarperCollins Publishers, Inc., 2000 - also available on
Amazon.com) describes an entire generation of world class leaders. It
seems that most leaders were mindful of this as several former
presidents, secretaries of state, prime ministers, and foreign
ministers have sang the praises to Mr. Lee. There is no argument from
this reviewer that the praise is well deserved and the reader of this
and the subsequent book will come to know Lee as crafty but
exceptionally brilliant political animal - but there are always more
sides to a story.have not lived in Singapore, nor have I visited this city-state, so my
comments may lack some of the perspective others have expressed in
their reviews. But it also means I may not have any of their bias
either.I found Lee's memoirs fascinating and very enlightening.
Throughout his political career, Lee and his People's Action Party were
in constant battle with the communists and other political forces that
either sought to oppress Singapore and Malaya, or to promote a racist
government that gave benefit to the Malays while leaving the indiginous
Chinese and Indians voiceless. It is true that Lee's PAP government
used authoritarian measures at times, but given the struggles Singapore
faced, it is a good thing that it did.The issue of racism in the
central Malaya government was most interesting, and Lee shows how this
racism, or bias in favor of the native Malays, led ultimately to
Singapore being expelled from the Malaysian nation. That turning point
was when Lee spoke in parliment in Malay without a prepared speech and
critisized the government for wasting its time on deciding what would
be the national language and who would control schools while all
Malaysians were suffering economic troubles in the country.While
it is true this is an autobiography, and naturally would present Lee's
perspective on his life and the issues he faced, Lee does so in my view
rather even-handedly, including excerpts of what his critics were
saying about him and not responding to these criticisms directly.
Rather, he would portray what the events were and what he believed
needed to be done. It is my conclusion that contrary to Lee's critics,
his vision of Singapore was egalitarian and while socialist in
practice, he always had all the races' needs in mind.Of
particular interest to me was Lee's observations of the various African
leaders he met with during the early sixties, as well as how he saw in
the way the Vatican selected a pope a political method to keep the PAP
free of communist infiltration. And Lee's vision of how law and order
is meted out gains interesting perspective from his rememberances of
the Japanese occupation of the territory during WWII.An excellent and easy to ready book.
cheers

khoa123
Học sinh đã quen với lớp trường
Học sinh đã quen với lớp trường

Nam Tổng số bài gửi : 46
Age : 22
Nơi sinh : Tôi yêu lớp 6/7 năm 2006-2007 mãi mãi
Tính cách : An choi
Nghề nghiệp/Sở thích : Student of Secondary School
Registration date : 14/04/2007

Xem lý lịch thành viên http://www.minhkhoa.tk

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Re: Truyền thuyết về Đảo Quốc Sư Tử SINGAPORE (Eng

Bài gửi  khoa123 on Sat Jun 23, 2007 9:59 pm

khoa123 đã viết:He will go down in history as one of Asia's most famous (or infamous)
statesmen. "The Singapore Story" tells one side of the story - Lee's.
Former Singaporean prime minister Lee Kuan Yew has long been acclaimed
for his outspoken persona and alert and thorough intellect. However, it
is not certain that he is fully aware of his impact (or maybe he is) on
other people - specially on Tunku Abdul Rahman. With this, the
inaugural volume of his autobiography, he also proves himself as an
charming and pleasant narrator - and therein lies the problem. The tone
of the book is almost benign - but was her really. His tale begins as
an distinguished student from a non pretentious bourgeois, English
speaking home (this proves problematic in the future as Lee makes his
way around the Chinese speaking communities). Lee's
deftly moves to recount how his education was discontinued by the
Japanese occupation in World War II - of which he also elaborates how
it taught him the many life lessons and impressions he would take into
the future political and personal trials he would undergo. After a
brief experiment as a black-market entrepreneur during the war (for
which he was able to support his family as well as other interests), he
decided to make his way to England after the Japanese defeat - to
become a practitioner of the Law. He recounts as well how he managed to
convinced Cambridge University to admit - not just himself - but his
future wife Choo as well - they were both eventually called to the Bar
in England. Upon passing the British rendition of the bar examination,
Lee decides to return home - to Singapore. Lee is quickly embroiled in
the complex labyrinth of Singaporean politics of independence while
both fighting and using - the Communist Party. If you read between the
lines, it is clear that Lee was anxious to be rid of this red menace
while playing "The Prince" and playing sides against each other.Convinced
that the red threat from Singapore could only be controlled by
assimilation into the federation of Malaysia, the Tunku entertains the
call by Lee to form Malaysia. Lee's story, told in extended and
obviously well documented detail really zeroes in on his dream of
uniting Singapore with Malaysia - only for it to come apart in the
seams - of which he is not completely blameless. Lee bitterly relates
his disappointment over Malaysian Prime Minister Tunku Abdul Rahman's
decision to ungraciously expel Singapore from the recently formed
Malaysian federation. Lee wishes to play the victim. If you treat each
side as a discourse - with its own set of truth creating mechanisms
(ontology) and societal formulas - it will be quickly evident the Lee's
formula is not welcome in the Tunku's Malaysia. No matter which side of
the argument the reader places him/herself, Lee posed a threat to
everything that the Tunku and his cadre held dear. As much as Lee
viewed (or perceived) the ills or threat that the Tunku's cadre (if not
the Tunku himself) represented, Lee had to admit that he was not in his
"zone" - he was out of his element. He did, in effect, break a trust
not to engage in federal politics (as originally agreed) - predictably
causing the ire of the Tunku. It is the chickens coming home to roost.While
gracious towards the Tunku, Lee turns his harshest appraisals of other
politicians in Kuala Lumpur - zeroing in on the close cadre of the
Tunku - the book goes into very informative detail in this regard.
Lee's wonderfully in-depth character analyses and impressions only
foreshadows volume two (Lee, Kuan Yew From Third World to First - The
Singapore Story: 1965 - 2000 Singapore and the Asian Economic Boom New
York: HarperCollins Publishers, Inc., 2000 - also available on
Amazon.com) describes an entire generation of world class leaders. It
seems that most leaders were mindful of this as several former
presidents, secretaries of state, prime ministers, and foreign
ministers have sang the praises to Mr. Lee. There is no argument from
this reviewer that the praise is well deserved and the reader of this
and the subsequent book will come to know Lee as crafty but
exceptionally brilliant political animal - but there are always more
sides to a story.have not lived in Singapore, nor have I visited this city-state, so my
comments may lack some of the perspective others have expressed in
their reviews. But it also means I may not have any of their bias
either.I found Lee's memoirs fascinating and very enlightening.
Throughout his political career, Lee and his People's Action Party were
in constant battle with the communists and other political forces that
either sought to oppress Singapore and Malaya, or to promote a racist
government that gave benefit to the Malays while leaving the indiginous
Chinese and Indians voiceless. It is true that Lee's PAP government
used authoritarian measures at times, but given the struggles Singapore
faced, it is a good thing that it did.The issue of racism in the
central Malaya government was most interesting, and Lee shows how this
racism, or bias in favor of the native Malays, led ultimately to
Singapore being expelled from the Malaysian nation. That turning point
was when Lee spoke in parliment in Malay without a prepared speech and
critisized the government for wasting its time on deciding what would
be the national language and who would control schools while all
Malaysians were suffering economic troubles in the country.While
it is true this is an autobiography, and naturally would present Lee's
perspective on his life and the issues he faced, Lee does so in my view
rather even-handedly, including excerpts of what his critics were
saying about him and not responding to these criticisms directly.
Rather, he would portray what the events were and what he believed
needed to be done. It is my conclusion that contrary to Lee's critics,
his vision of Singapore was egalitarian and while socialist in
practice, he always had all the races' needs in mind.Of
particular interest to me was Lee's observations of the various African
leaders he met with during the early sixties, as well as how he saw in
the way the Vatican selected a pope a political method to keep the PAP
free of communist infiltration. And Lee's vision of how law and order
is meted out gains interesting perspective from his rememberances of
the Japanese occupation of the territory during WWII.An excellent and easy to ready book.
cheers
Ngai` Lee la` thu tuong Singapore Lee Hsieng Long

khoa123
Học sinh đã quen với lớp trường
Học sinh đã quen với lớp trường

Nam Tổng số bài gửi : 46
Age : 22
Nơi sinh : Tôi yêu lớp 6/7 năm 2006-2007 mãi mãi
Tính cách : An choi
Nghề nghiệp/Sở thích : Student of Secondary School
Registration date : 14/04/2007

Xem lý lịch thành viên http://www.minhkhoa.tk

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Re: Truyền thuyết về Đảo Quốc Sư Tử SINGAPORE (Eng

Bài gửi  carrot on Mon Jun 25, 2007 9:00 am

Thằng nì bịnh nặng à nha
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Đọc hỉu chít á
Đã dzị còn reply lại nữa chớ
Khìn

carrot
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Re: Truyền thuyết về Đảo Quốc Sư Tử SINGAPORE (Eng

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